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Sunday 12th October 2014; Photograms

After seeing the famous Man Ray’s work, I wanted to look at how photograms have been altered and developed, by looking at recent pieces of work, to see how they have adapted this black and white technique. This is also important so I can get a broader range of ideas, instead of sticking to one style. For example, I found Ray’s work to be very metephorical, having meaning, and gorgous tones of grey, so how can anything compare? Below are one piece of work from each individual artist that I really like or even dislike…

Abelardo Morell,  Contact Print, 2006

Abelardo Morell, Contact Print, 2006

Abelardo Morell’s work I thoroughly enjoyed because of the textures he was creating, the glass property is transparent, and I love this technique is showing ripples within this texture. It is extremely contrasting in comparison to the black pears, solid objects. Compared to most photograms they are quite dark, but this emphasizes on reflective light objects, something I could learn from so as to create textures myself.

Maureen McQuillan, 2009

Maureen McQuillan, 2009

Again looking at texture, but most importantly, and inspired by the Ferris wheel scene, I really loved the mass amount of lines swirling away. Personally I get a sense of movement, with the way it is unwinding, supported by the ripples, this feature is something that could be a interesting concept to take away; motion…The Ferris wheel is a motioned, disorientating feature in the film, this pattern links with this I feel because of this relentless circular motion that makes you feel sick if you follow the movement of one line of ripples.

The blur on the image is also a elegant feature, with regards to how it eases the focus off the image…

Student Work inspired by work of Henrik Garnell, 2012

Student Work inspired by work of Henrik Garnell, 2012

When looking for more textured photograms, I came across something which instantly reminded me of the bridge scene I like from The Third Man. The reflective, sharp and geometric properties of the metal of this image, reminds me of the properties of the metal, thus linking to the large structures on the film such as the bridge.

ignitechannel.com,2014

ignitechannel.com,2014

This above piece of work does not actually have a specific artist, however I needed to show this because I love how the technique uses photograms, but now begins to explore the elements of digitally enhancing by adding colours. In addition it is fantastic to see how photograms can be used as a disection tool, to see the properties and elements of raw materials.

artist not known; http://blogs.egusd.net/

Love the texture of the water particles, the grainy feel is empowering against the triangle, artist not known; http://blogs.egusd.net/

Jeremy Lynch (Bryant, 2014)

Jeremy Lynch (Bryant, 2014)

Lynch’s design here I think is very clever, this exhibited piece has become part of the home, both a mirror and a photogram. As you can see there is light formations created, but they almost blend into the surroundings, as if they were abnormalities in this home. It gives both the illusion of light and space within this interior, whilst still being a photogram, ingenious work!

Katie Shapiro, Error, 2013

Katie Shapiro, Error, 2013

Thomas Ruff , 2013

Thomas Ruff , 2013

As I begun to explore more into ‘diverse’ and geometric photograms I came across Thomas Ruff, he did something which was fantastic adding colour into photograms, and still using the traditional ‘camera-less’ photography used in the 1920’s. Yet what I really love about this, is the forms he has created, it reminds me more of the Ferris wheel scene than the bridge.

Now what? I still need to decided on which scene I am going to use, a lot of the research I have looked at links into two scenes I really want to use. Yet the decision will be choosing the one that interests me the most. 

Keith Carter, weburbanist.com

Keith Carter, weburbanist.com

Moving on, I have been looking into a range of techniques, yet this work caught my attention by Carter, but again the name William Henry Fox Talbot popped up again. He was the key figure in the movement of photography, thus why I have researched some of his paintings, and images that he has captured showing architecture also.

Regarding the designs by Carter, I was intrigued to know his method creating these photograms, using old, lacy handkerchiefs, and then using specimens, body parts and other intriguing effects. I love this idea that he has created a modern adaptation of the old methods used, however these are really ancient looking, still showing that there is a link to the past. In addition, the use of animals here look very scientific, a feature I think is very clever, using the animals skin cells, and body structure to form this imagery.

171526-3e31bc94-bad6-11e3-a30e-7fa6d7d0bb68

Sue Ford.

I wanted to then move on from the famous artists within the photogram area, and look at Sue Ford, her work I was not as keen on, this particular image for me feels child like, yet I can respect the imagery/ illusion she is trying to create. I think maybe using hands might not be the best ‘material’ to use in my designs.

Nearing the end of my research into photograms (due to having seen a varied collection of work), I then came across a very talented photographer called Imogen Cunningham. I adored her designs! Particularly the flower, it is so elegant, it reminds me of film noir with the use of shadows and texture, lighting, shape, but at the same time it is also the opposite of the stereotype of the film.

I chose these images as my favourites because of the peaceful feeling I got from the less menacing shadows, the brightness, the scientific look of the leaf. This Photogram in particular showed the branches the small particles, these in-depth features I loved. The imagery it created, life is like a branch, growing all the time, creating new forms. This style of imagery is something I would like to try and interpret in my work, and time and again photograms have best showed this through there well thought out black and white features…

Imogen Cunningham

Imogen Cunningham

imogen2

Imogen Cunningham Photography

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